Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Grace Mugabe settles Military Debt to China With 35 Elephants

Must read

WHO says coronavirus crisis will get “worse and worse and worse”

The World Health Organization has said that the coronavirus pandemic isn't easing down anytime soon if countries fail to adhere to strict healthcare precautions. The...

Malian jihadist war crimes trial begins in The Hague

In 2012, a coalition of Islamic extremists occupied the ancient city of Timbuktu in the Saharan desert. They imposed a brutal regime, murdering and...

Covid-19: Will Africa still be world’s fastest-growing consumer markets?

Prior to the pandemic, Africa was identified as one of the fastest-growing consumer markets in the world with household consumption growing even faster than...

South Africa: Youngest daughter of Nelson Mandela dies

The youngest daughter of South Africa's first black president Nelson Mandela, Zindzi Mandela has died at the age of 59. The state broadcaster the SABC...
Isaac Kaledzihttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Kaledzi
Isaac Kaledzi is an experienced and award winning journalist from Ghana. He has worked for several media brands both in Ghana and on the International scene. Isaac Kaledzi is currently serving as an African Correspondent for DW.
- Advertisement -

Zimbabwean First Lady Grace Mugabe has reportedly been embroiled in yet another controversy after it emerged that she allegedly used the country’s animals to settle a Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) debt.

According to The Times, Grace sent a “menagerie of safari animals to a Chinese wildlife park to pay for military uniforms for the DRC”.

At least 35 elephant calves, eight lions, a dozen hyenas and a giraffe were sent to China to settle a debt for boots and uniforms bought for the Congolese military force.

Mugabe, 92, has had close ties with DRC President Joseph Kabila, 45, and his late father, Laurent, since 1997, when Zimbabwe sent troops there to help squash a rebellion supported by Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi.

Quoting conservationists, the report said that there were fears the elephants could be used to start an ivory-farming operation in China.

 A detailed report published on the New Zimbabwe website said that the elephants were allegedly captured at the Hwange National Park and flown out of the country in a Russian-registered Boeing 747 belonging to AirBridge Cargo.
- Advertisement -

A wildlife expert, Nick Lynch, who has reportedly been monitoring the transaction since 2014, described as “a mad act of cruelty” the separation of the young elephants from their herds.

Zimbabwean wildlife officials have defended the move, saying it “would ease pressure on the ‘overburdened’ parks”.

This comes a few days after a Harare judge ordered Grace to return three properties that she seized from a Lebanese businessman in a botched $1.35m diamond ring deal.

- Advertisement -

Source: News24

- Advertisement -

More articles

- Advertisement -

Latest article

WHO says coronavirus crisis will get “worse and worse and worse”

The World Health Organization has said that the coronavirus pandemic isn't easing down anytime soon if countries fail to adhere to strict healthcare precautions. The...

Malian jihadist war crimes trial begins in The Hague

In 2012, a coalition of Islamic extremists occupied the ancient city of Timbuktu in the Saharan desert. They imposed a brutal regime, murdering and...

Covid-19: Will Africa still be world’s fastest-growing consumer markets?

Prior to the pandemic, Africa was identified as one of the fastest-growing consumer markets in the world with household consumption growing even faster than...

South Africa: Youngest daughter of Nelson Mandela dies

The youngest daughter of South Africa's first black president Nelson Mandela, Zindzi Mandela has died at the age of 59. The state broadcaster the SABC...

Sudan: Women no longer need permission to travel with kids

New laws passed recently in Sudan have taken effect now allowing women to travel with their children without needing a permission from a male...