Saturday, October 31, 2020

Algeria accused of dumping migrants in the Desert

Must read

Ivorians vote in crucial polls amid opposition boycott

Ivorians are voting in a controversial presidential election which has been boycotted by the opposition. Former president, Henri Konan Bédié, and the former prime minister,...

These positions in bed will make your woman come hard

Women and men don’t always agree about what qualifies as great sex. Due to our differing anatomies, what feels pleasurable to one partner may not...

Tanzania: John Magufuli wins presidential election

President of Tanzania John Magufuli has been declared winner of the country's October 28 presidential election. The electoral commission declared Mr Magufuli winner saying he...

Husband of Africa’s richest woman dies in Dubai accident

Sindika Dokolo, the husband of Africa's richest woman, Isabel dos Santos, has died at the age of 48. Mr Dokolo's family confirmed that he had...
Isaac Kaledzihttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Kaledzi
Isaac Kaledzi is an experienced and award winning journalist from Ghana. He has worked for several media brands both in Ghana and on the International scene. Isaac Kaledzi is currently serving as an African Correspondent for DW.
- Advertisement -

Algeria has been accused of abandoning migrants in the Sahara Desert, a development the UN has warned could trigger another crisis.

The International Organisation for Migration (IOM) has said that it has been forced to take in and handle some 10,000 migrants who were left to die in the desert since September.

The situation is likely to create a humanitarian crisis along the Niger border. Many of the migrants were abandoned by traffickers and a significant number deported by Algerian authorities.

These migrants have to endure harsh conditions in the desert hoping to reach the nearest border town. Many who are unable to endure the heat die in the process.

One migrant, from Mali, recounted his own experience to the BBC by saying that “They took all our belongings – money, mobiles, everything. They treated us badly. They dropped us in the Sahara Desert.”

- Advertisement -

The migrant also said that “we were forced to walk dozens of kilometres to reach Assamaka, the border town. It was like walking through hell. Pregnant women and underage children were trudging along as the Sahara sun was beating us down. We had nothing to eat, and we heard that at least two people died in the dunes.”


IOM’s chief of mission in Niger, Giuseppe Loprete has raised awareness about the plights of these migrants many of whom are coming from Sub-Saharan African countries.

They have been hoping to reach Europe for greener pasture.

 

- Advertisement -

Source: Africafeeds.com

- Advertisement -

More articles

- Advertisement -

Latest article

Ivorians vote in crucial polls amid opposition boycott

Ivorians are voting in a controversial presidential election which has been boycotted by the opposition. Former president, Henri Konan Bédié, and the former prime minister,...

These positions in bed will make your woman come hard

Women and men don’t always agree about what qualifies as great sex. Due to our differing anatomies, what feels pleasurable to one partner may not...

Tanzania: John Magufuli wins presidential election

President of Tanzania John Magufuli has been declared winner of the country's October 28 presidential election. The electoral commission declared Mr Magufuli winner saying he...

Husband of Africa’s richest woman dies in Dubai accident

Sindika Dokolo, the husband of Africa's richest woman, Isabel dos Santos, has died at the age of 48. Mr Dokolo's family confirmed that he had...

Child Online Protection Guidelines launched in Africa

Child Online Protection Guidelines in Africa was launched on Friday, 30 October 2020. The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) launched the guidelines following a training program...
- Advertisement -