Thursday, August 6, 2020

African women in Tech hold summit to push for reforms

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Isaac Kaledzihttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Kaledzi
Isaac Kaledzi is an experienced and award winning journalist from Ghana. He has worked for several media brands both in Ghana and on the International scene. Isaac Kaledzi is currently serving as an African Correspondent for DW.
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Hundreds of women and girls in technology across Africa are holding a summit in Ghana’s capital Accra to push for reforms.

They are demanding reforms in policies across Africa to empower girls and women in the tech sector.

The summit is providing the platform for these women to find solutions to the growing digital gender gap in Africa.

This year’s Africa Summit on Women and Girls in Technology which started on Tuesday is the second edition.

Over the next three days the women will be discussing key steps needed to be taken to get vulnerable groups connected online.

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Bridging the digital gap

In a statement the Webfoundation, one of the organizers of the summit said “Bridging the digital gender gap is a critical step toward the vision of a thriving Africa.”

“Research has shown that women in some communities are up to 50% less likely than men to be online. In Africa, where nearly 75% of the population remains offline, this problem is particularly acute.” the statement added.

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Organizers hope at the time when very soon “50% of the world” will be “connected online, women remain amongst the least likely to be connected, which has far reaching consequences.”

High level conversations

High-level panels have been engaging with participants focusing on making broadband affordable to women and girls.


Providing digital and entrepreneurship skills to women and the disabled is also a major focus for the summit.


 

 

Source: Africafeeds.com

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