Monday, April 12, 2021

Uganda’s social media tax challenged in court

Must read

Zambian athletes fight stigma against albinos, disabled persons

Lassam Katongo, a Zambian athlete based in the capital, Lusaka, shows off his trophies and medals earned from some of the international athletic games...

Uganda, Tanzania sign $3.5bn deal with global oil firms

The governments of Tanzania and Uganda on Sunday signed a long awaited oil deal with international oil firms—French Total E&P, and China’s Cnooc. The deal...

Man with snails, ‘prekese’ in luggage from Ghana detained at JFK Airport

A man was detained briefly last week after arriving at JFK Airport with luggage full of snails, dried beef, turkey berry, carrot, oxtail, medicinal...

The African Union’s digital Covid-19 passport for travelers

The African Union has developed a common continental Covid-19 digital passport for travelers and airlines. It is an initiative by African Union's lead health agency,...
Isaac Kaledzihttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Kaledzi
Isaac Kaledzi is an experienced and award winning journalist from Ghana. He has worked for several media brands both in Ghana and on the International scene. Isaac Kaledzi is currently serving as an African Correspondent for DW.
- Advertisement -

Uganda’s latest social media tax system is facing a legal challenge after a group of activists filed a petition in court.

The petition filed to the constitutional court says the policy is awkward.

The tax regime which affects social media platforms such as WhatsApp and Facebook has taken effect from this month.

Uganda’s Parliament last month passed the law that imposing a tax of $0.05 daily for each social media user.

A lawyer for the petitioners, Daniel Bill Opio says the is unconstitutional.

- Advertisement -

“Youths are taking on initiatives toward innovation and technology mostly using these … platforms. Once you introduce a tax … you are actually killing this budding entrepreneurship,” Opio added.

The controversial law affects users of all social media platforms accessing the internet.

Government’s justification

The government of Uganda says the latest move is part of plans to raise revenue.

The country’s Finance Minister Matia Kasaija had said that each mobile phone subscriber using platforms such as WhatsApp, Twitter and Facebook would be charged $0.027 per day (200 Ugandan shillings).

- Advertisement -

“We’re looking for money to maintain the security of the country and extend electricity so that you people can enjoy more of social media, more often, more frequently,” Kasaija said.

More than 40 percent of people use the internet in Uganda but cost of data is high like in other African countries.

About 23.6 million people out of Uganda’s 41 million population use mobile phones and 17 million use the internet.

 

Source: Africafeeds.com

- Advertisement -

More articles

- Advertisement -

Latest article

Zambian athletes fight stigma against albinos, disabled persons

Lassam Katongo, a Zambian athlete based in the capital, Lusaka, shows off his trophies and medals earned from some of the international athletic games...

Uganda, Tanzania sign $3.5bn deal with global oil firms

The governments of Tanzania and Uganda on Sunday signed a long awaited oil deal with international oil firms—French Total E&P, and China’s Cnooc. The deal...

Man with snails, ‘prekese’ in luggage from Ghana detained at JFK Airport

A man was detained briefly last week after arriving at JFK Airport with luggage full of snails, dried beef, turkey berry, carrot, oxtail, medicinal...

The African Union’s digital Covid-19 passport for travelers

The African Union has developed a common continental Covid-19 digital passport for travelers and airlines. It is an initiative by African Union's lead health agency,...

Tanzania’s President in Uganda for her first official state visit

Tanzania's President Samia Suluhu Hassan arrived in Uganda on Sunday for her first foreign trip and state visit since becoming President. President Hassan inspected a...
- Advertisement -