Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Anti-foreigner sentiment re-emerges in South Africa

Must read

Nigeria’s Okonjo-Iweala becomes first African to head the WTO

Nigeria’s Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala has been voted as the new head of the World Trade Organization. She secured 106 out of 164 votes to become the...

South Africa’s president in self-quarantine after Covid-19 contact

President Cyril Ramaphosa is in self-quarantine after a guest at a dinner the president attended on Saturday tested positive for COVID-19, the presidency said...

Seychelles: The priest who became president after sixth attempt

In 1998, Wavel Ramkalawan, an Anglican cleric first contested as president of his country Seychelles. That was not going to be his last time but...

Philadelphia rocked by fresh unrest after police shooting

Hundreds of protesters in Philadelphia have marched through the city for a second night, demanding racial justice after police fatally shot a black man. The...
Isaac Kaledzihttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Kaledzi
Isaac Kaledzi is an experienced and award winning journalist from Ghana. He has worked for several media brands both in Ghana and on the International scene. Isaac Kaledzi is currently serving as an African Correspondent for DW.
- Advertisement -

Xenophobic sentiments against foreigners in South Africa have emerged once again among locals.

The hashtag #NigeriansMustGo has been trending on social media in South Africa as locals revive anti-foreigner agitations.

Last week a protest was held outside the Nigerian High Commission in the capital, Pretoria, under the hashtag #PutSouthAfricansFirst.

Some South Africans pushed for reforms as they complain about the crime rate in their communities, alleging Nigerians play a major role in numbers surging.

Nigerians arrested for crime

- Advertisement -

Local media reported recently that a police raid led to five Nigerians being arrested and charged with human trafficking after 11 women were found to be working as sex workers at brothels disguised as a bed-and-breakfast.

Nigeria’s High Commissioner Bala Kabiru said during that protest march that “We don’t accept the profiling of Nigerians in South Africa.”

Some South Africans claim African immigrants in the country have taken their jobs and driving crime rate high.

- Advertisement -

But there are others who disagree that immigrants are to blame for South Africa’s economic and social problems.

Source: Africafeeds.com

- Advertisement -

More articles

- Advertisement -

Latest article

Nigeria’s Okonjo-Iweala becomes first African to head the WTO

Nigeria’s Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala has been voted as the new head of the World Trade Organization. She secured 106 out of 164 votes to become the...

South Africa’s president in self-quarantine after Covid-19 contact

President Cyril Ramaphosa is in self-quarantine after a guest at a dinner the president attended on Saturday tested positive for COVID-19, the presidency said...

Seychelles: The priest who became president after sixth attempt

In 1998, Wavel Ramkalawan, an Anglican cleric first contested as president of his country Seychelles. That was not going to be his last time but...

Philadelphia rocked by fresh unrest after police shooting

Hundreds of protesters in Philadelphia have marched through the city for a second night, demanding racial justice after police fatally shot a black man. The...

Tanzanians vote in crucial general elections

Tanzanians are voting on Wednesday in general elections as they choose a president and members of parliament. It will be the sixth multi party general...
- Advertisement -