Sunday, June 26, 2022

Rwanda rejects ‘insulting’ criticism on UK asylum plan

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Isaac Kaledzi
Isaac Kaledzihttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Kaledzi
Isaac Kaledzi is an experienced and award winning journalist from Ghana. He has worked for several media brands both in Ghana and on the International scene. Isaac Kaledzi is currently serving as an African Correspondent for DW.
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The Ugandan government is rejecting the continuous international criticism of its plan to receive asylum seekers from the UK.

A government spokesperson Yolande Makolo has described such criticisms as “insulting”, asking such critics to travel to the eastern Africa country to see the progress it had made.

A legal action forced the first flight due to take asylum seekers from the UK to Rwanda to be cancelled minutes before take-off on Tuesday evening.

The flight was stopped after a late intervention from the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) led to fresh challenges in the UK courts.

The first flight was expected to fly out up to seven people to the east African country.

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Makolo from the Rwandan government in a tweet attached a video clip of South African comedian Trevor Noah criticising the reaction to the asylum plan.

“The narrative that living in Africa is a punishment is insulting for those who live here and are working hard to build our countries. We want Africa to succeed. Rwanda has made tremendous progress. People should come and see,” Ms Makolo tweeted.

Per the scheme agreed on between the UK and Rwanda, single men arriving in the UK illegally in small boats or lorries will be sent to Rwanda for resettlement.

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Such people who arrived in the UK by 1 January may be sent to Rwanda, where their asylum claims will be processed.

Details of the scheme explained that such deportees will be given accommodation and support and would be free to come and go from their lodgings at all times, while their claims are being considered.

Once the claims of these asylum seekers are accepted they would be helped to build a “new life” in Rwanda, with up to five years’ access to education and support there, the UK government said in a statement.

 

Asylum flight to Rwanda cancelled after legal action

 

Source: Africafeeds.com

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