Saturday, September 26, 2020

Sudan appoints first female chief justice

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Isaac Kaledzihttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Kaledzi
Isaac Kaledzi is an experienced and award winning journalist from Ghana. He has worked for several media brands both in Ghana and on the International scene. Isaac Kaledzi is currently serving as an African Correspondent for DW.
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Sudan’s Sovereign council has announced the appointment of the country’s first female chief justice.

Supreme Court judge Neemat Abdulllah was picked to occupy the highest position in the Judiciary.

She will be heading the country’s judicial system and overseeing the overhaul of the justice system.

The appointment by the Sovereign Council, which is made up of civilian and military officials tells of the emerging reforms taking place in the north African nation.

Many consider the move significant in dealing with issues of gender inequality in Sudan.

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The 11-member Sovereign Council which is governing Sudan has only two women serving on it.

But activists want more to be done towards female appointments in government.

Sudan has been undergoing political and governance reforms after the overthrow of ex-leader, Omar al-Bashir in April this year.

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Protests by citizens which led to some deaths have been pivotal in triggering reforms in Sudan.

The new prime minister, Abdalla Hamdok has vowed to tackle conflict and build a stronger economy.

As leader of the transitional government he has the task of restoring peace as well and helping to return the country to civilian rule.

Elections are however expected in 2022, after a planned 39-month long transition to democracy.

 

Source: Africafeeds.com

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