Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Founder of Nigeria’s notorious police unit SARS ‘feels guilty’

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Isaac Kaledzihttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Kaledzi
Isaac Kaledzi is an experienced and award winning journalist from Ghana. He has worked for several media brands both in Ghana and on the International scene. Isaac Kaledzi is currently serving as an African Correspondent for DW.
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Fulani Kwajafa founded the recently disbanded and hated police unit the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) in 1984.

But years later the unit has become a point of hate and agitations among the citizens its officers were supposed to protect.

Members of the SARS unit were accused of committing extrajudicial killings and torture.

Recent killings carried out allegedly by some of the members of SARS sparked protests in Nigeria, receiving support globally.

Kwajafa told the BBC that he feels sad and guilty about the notorious image of the disbanded SARS in recent years.

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“Sars of today is not the same Sars I established in 1984,” Fulani Kwajafa told the BBC.

The decision by the government to disband the unit did not even appease citizens but rather further ruffled feathers among some Nigerians.

Thousands of Nigerians have been outraged over the unveiling of a new unit to replace the SARS.

According to the head of the police Mohammed Adamu the new Special Weapons and Tactics (Swat) would carry out the duties handled by the unit which was disbanded after days of protests.

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But many angry Nigerians took to social especially twitter using the hashtag #EndSwat to oppose the new unit.

They contend that the changes are not good enough to reform the Nigerian police service.

Protests have continued since last week, spreading across the country with reports of brutalities from armed men and in some cases police officers.

 

Nigerians reject new police unit to replace disbanded force

 

Source: Africafeeds.com

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