Thursday, August 13, 2020

Burundi government not to attend peace talks

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Isaac Kaledzi is an experienced and award winning journalist from Ghana. He has worked for several media brands both in Ghana and on the International scene. Isaac Kaledzi is currently serving as an African Correspondent for DW.
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The government of Burundi has said it will not attend peace talks scheduled to resume in Tanzania on Thursday, although the main opposition alliance has confirmed its participation.

The talks are meant to find an end to a violent political crisis that began in 2015 after President Pierre Nkurunziza said he would seek a third term – a move opponents said violated the constitution and a peace deal that ended an ethnically charged civil war.

“The government of Burundi finds some irregularities in the organization of this present session,” a government statement said on Wednesday. Spokesman Phillipe Nzobonariba said the government objected to the presence of senior U.N. adviser Benomar Jamal, but did not say why.

The government has repeatedly accused the U.N. of bias against it after several human rights groups have said the security forces and ruling party have committed abuses.

The main opposition grouping, CNARED, said it would attend the talks although it has previously accused mediator Benjamin William Mpaka, a former president of Tanzania, of bias.

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Mpaka said in December that Nkurunziza was legitimate and that mediators should focus on setting up elections for 2020.

The violence in Burundi has alarmed people in a region where memories of the 1994 genocide in neighboring Rwanda remain raw.

 

 

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Source: Reuters

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