Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Nigerian ‘witchcraft conference’ sparks outrage

Must read

Nigeria’s Okonjo-Iweala becomes first African to head the WTO

Nigeria’s Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala has been voted as the new head of the World Trade Organization. She secured 104 out of 164 votes to become the...

South Africa’s president in self-quarantine after Covid-19 contact

President Cyril Ramaphosa is in self-quarantine after a guest at a dinner the president attended on Saturday tested positive for COVID-19, the presidency said...

Seychelles: The priest who became president after sixth attempt

In 1998, Wavel Ramkalawan, an Anglican cleric first contested as president of his country Seychelles. That was not going to be his last time but...

Philadelphia rocked by fresh unrest after police shooting

Hundreds of protesters in Philadelphia have marched through the city for a second night, demanding racial justice after police fatally shot a black man. The...
Staff Writer
Africa Feeds Staff writers are group of African journalists focused on reporting news about the continent and the rest of the world.
- Advertisement -

A conference meant to discuss issues related to witchcraft in a Nigerian University has sparked outrage.

The two-day event being organised by the University of Nigeria in Nsukka in the eastern state of Enugu has angered community members largely dominated by Christians.

Protests were staged by religious groups mainly Christians and Muslims.

It forced the academic conference to change the topic to a more attractive topic of “dimensions of human behaviour”.

Witchcraft or what many in Africa refer to as “Juju” is abhorred by Christians and Muslims who consider it evil.

- Advertisement -

Witchcraft conference in Nigeria
The conference had to change it’s topic after protests. Photo: BBC

But there are many Africans who consult traditional witchcraft practitioners for solutions to various ailments.

Some resort to witchcraft to secure magical powers to protect themselves from misfortunes.

Often people perceived to be practicing witchcraft are treated with disdain and sometimes attacked in some communities.

- Advertisement -

In July this year eSwatini, formerly known as Swaziland had to ban a planned competition for witchdoctors.

The competition often pits witchdoctors against each other in a battle of skills.

But the government said “The proposed competition of witchcraft and magic spells was unheard of in the country and it was regarded as an anomaly in the lives of the people of eSwatini.”

Source: Africafeeds.com

- Advertisement -

More articles

- Advertisement -

Latest article

Nigeria’s Okonjo-Iweala becomes first African to head the WTO

Nigeria’s Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala has been voted as the new head of the World Trade Organization. She secured 104 out of 164 votes to become the...

South Africa’s president in self-quarantine after Covid-19 contact

President Cyril Ramaphosa is in self-quarantine after a guest at a dinner the president attended on Saturday tested positive for COVID-19, the presidency said...

Seychelles: The priest who became president after sixth attempt

In 1998, Wavel Ramkalawan, an Anglican cleric first contested as president of his country Seychelles. That was not going to be his last time but...

Philadelphia rocked by fresh unrest after police shooting

Hundreds of protesters in Philadelphia have marched through the city for a second night, demanding racial justice after police fatally shot a black man. The...

Tanzanians vote in crucial general elections

Tanzanians are voting on Wednesday in general elections as they choose a president and members of parliament. It will be the sixth multi party general...
- Advertisement -